Enerworks Inc.

Applications

1. Solar Domestic Hot Water

This is a simple Solar Hot Water system using a Stainless Steel Heat Exchanger tank.

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2. Solar Domestic Hot Water combined with a Wood Stove

As #1 but using the extra ports in the tank to incorporate wood stove heating. This is possible in a single tank because the Thermomax collectors are able to add heat to a tank that is already hot – even in adverse weather.


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3. Solar Domestic Hot Water, Wood Stove and a Hot Tub


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4. Solar Domestic Hot Water, Wood Stove and Space Heating

A very practical way to combine these three – but also see #5 for the ultimate versatility.


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5. Overall Concept for Off Grid with Demand Gas Boiler

This tank, which doubles as an electric boiler, is designed to store Domestic Hot Water. It has one heat exchange coil to add solar heat, one to take heat off to radiant floor or hot tub applications and connections for up to 12kw of electric elements, which can be used to add heat from any electrical generation system, or, as a dump for excess wattage from PV, micro-hydro or other integrated systems. In addition, connections are provided for optional wood stove and/or demand gas boiler to be plumbed directly to the tank.
See #5B for Wind Generator and Micro Hydro.

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5B. Solar Domestic Hot Water with “Off Grid” Tank with Wind & Hydro Space Heating

The original purpose for which the “Off Grid” tank was designed, to receive energy from intermittent sources – solar thermal, wood stove, wind, micro hydro, PV – and store it as heat for use as domestic hot water, space heating, hot tub etc. This tank is very versatile and should be the heart of any off grid system. It can be adapted to any future technology easily.

It’s ability to use a demand gas boiler as backup is not shown – see #5 for this.


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6. Overall Concept with Triple Coil Tank – Backup by any Fuel

We have installed many of these tanks and their natural stratification eliminates the need for expensive and troublesome controls. In practice not all components may be used, but this shows what is possible. Similar to the above Off Grid tank, the third coil allows a high efficiency electric, gas, propane, or oil boiler to be added for backup, making this a mainstream system for high end homes – as well as a versatile one for “off grid” systems. It also allows for system expansion to incorporate future technologies. An electric element connection is offered for DHW backup.


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7. Larger, Institutional and Commercial Schematic

Expandable tanking for commercial installations. This provides quick recovery for a small volume of water then goes on to preheat the upstream water. This is a most efficient way to keep the backup from coming on.


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8. Solar Swimming Pool with Solar Domestic Hot Water Priority

How to link pool heating with a domestic hot water tank.


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9. Summer Heat Store/Dump for Space Heating System

Collectors that are over sized for winter heating may need a system for storing or dumping excess heat in the summer. It is preferable to continue circulating the system than to turn it off because this extends the life of the glycol and reduces the risk of future maintenance problems. This can be achieved by diverting the flow from the heat exchange coil to a heat store or some heat dump mechanism. Alternatively, one could heat a seasonal pool or hot tub.


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10. Commercial Hot Water Pre-heat System, New or Retrofit

The high temperature capabilities of the Thermomax Collectors allow a simple preheat system for commercial installations. The preheat tank(s) are heated rapidly by the solar array until they are 10°F above the temperature in the main tank. A small circulating pump is then activated to circulate both tanks together and the solar can push the total volume of water up to the high limit set point. A tempering valve is recommended on the main DHW outlet. This is very efficient and does not interfere with an existing system.


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12. Solar Domestic Hot Water with Pre-Heat Electric Tank

If more backup is needed a preheat tank is used. This can be in inexpensive 50 or 60 gallon tank placed close to the existing one. The elements are not used in the preheat tank.


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13. Solar Domestic Hot Water Pre-Heat with Recirculation

This is an interesting version of #12, with more capacity. It utilizes the extra storage available in the main tank above the temperature that the elements are set at. This is the most efficient domestic hot water system for a large family.


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14. Solar Domestic Hot Water with Fan Convector For Smaller Space Heating

We are often asked about space heating, which the Thermomax vacuum tube collectors are very good at. Some areas are better than others, but the main problem is what to do with surplus heat in the summer. Without a swimming pool, sizing up a collector for space heating is not always practical.

Here is a cost effective way of sizing up a DHW system to provide some heat in specific areas of the home without interfering with the main heating system. The heat switches to the fan convector when the tank is hot.


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16. Commercial Hot Water with Multiple Tanks in Series

In this example, three (or more) tanks are connected in series and there is a pump station installed with a corresponding number of pumps. The tanks are prioritized through sensors, with the priority going to whichever tank is closest to the hot water output. This is the most efficient arrangement possible for larger systems as it prioritizes on a small quantity of water which reaches usable temperature making back up unnecessary. The less efficient alternative is heating a large body of water to lower temperature with the same ammount of energy. This requires a back up boost to usable temperatures.


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The object is to stop the back up coming on rather than counting BTU’s!

Conceptual Closed Loop Installation:

Closed Loop System

Hydronic Heating Systems:

A Hydronic Heating System is one based on water as the medium of heat collection, storage, and delivery. A hydronic system can be divided into three basic components:
17. Low Power Radiant System
Heat Source – e.g. solar collectors, wood stove, geothermal, or a high efficiency boiler using electric, natural gas, propane, oil or wood.
Heat Store – for typical installations a water tank with one, two or three heat exchange coils. For larger systems a thermal mass (e.g. water, concrete or rock). Phase change materials can also be incorporated.
Application – Domestic hot water, space heating, hot tub, towel rail, snow melt commercial hot water for hospitals, nursing homes, car washes, laundromats, etc. For space heating, a radiant system is recommended.

Conceptual Closed Loop Installation:

Closed Loop System

Hydronic Heating Systems:

A Hydronic Heating System is one based on water as the medium of heat collection, storage, and delivery. A hydronic system can be divided into three basic components:
17. Low Power Radiant System
Heat Source – e.g. solar collectors, wood stove, geothermal, or a high efficiency boiler using electric, natural gas, propane, oil or wood.
Heat Store – for typical installations a water tank with one, two or three heat exchange coils. For larger systems a thermal mass (e.g. water, concrete or rock). Phase change materials can also be incorporated.
Application – Domestic hot water, space heating, hot tub, towel rail, snow melt commercial hot water for hospitals, nursing homes, car washes, laundromats, etc. For space heating, a radiant system is recommended.